Belva Davis, the first African-American woman to become a television reporter on the U.S. West Coast. /  The Black Diaries

Belva Davis, the first African-American woman to become a television reporter on the U.S. West Coast. / The Black Diaries

 

Sometimes the first step is recognition.

Now, sexist news examples can be tracked and reporters can be coached by their audiences. This public Google Sheet will act as a misogyny watchdog providing a space where people can continue to cite examples of sexist language and framing. 


Serena Williams’ most recent loss at the US Open is at the forefront of my mind. News outlets wrote headlines like ‘Angry, Violent Outbursts’ for something that is often celebrated in the men’s game. She was docked points when the chair official called a coaching violation on her. When she argued the call, the official docked more points. Similar behavior and so much worse occurs all the time on the men’s side with zero consequences.
— Adrian Edmonds, Dean of Instruction, Austin, TX
Female candidates are often asked whether they can ‘juggle’ their political responsibilities with their role as a mother. For example, as USA Today wrote in 2014, ‘It’s unclear how Chelsea’s pregnancy will affect Hillary Clinton, who is considering a race for president in 2016.’

How many newspapers asked that question when Mitt Romney was proudly photographed with his 18 grandchildren, or when George W. Bush and John McCain showed theirs off for the press? That’s right: zero.
— Prof. Virginia García Beaudoux, Professor of Politics and Public Opinion, Universidad de Buenos Aires